Airplane Mode

Airplane Mode is Gone: Now You Never Have To Talk to a Stranger Again

Airplane Mode

In a long-awaited announcement, the FAA will stop requiring passengers to turn off phones and computers during take-off and landing.  Under the old rules you had to keep them off (“that’s fully off and powered down, not airplane mode, not hidden in your pocket” as some flight attendants used to say) until the airplane rose above 10,000, but that ceiling has now been removed.

You still can’t actually talk on the phone, but you can keep reading, playing games, or writing emails as long as you like. Apparently, while the FAA used to say that phone signals could interfere with the plane, they now that’s not usually the case although carriers must demonstrate that their planes can withstand the interference. Here’s the statement:

Passengers will eventually be able to read e-books, play games, and watch videos on their devices during all phases of flight, with very limited exceptions. Electronic items, books and magazines, must be held or put in the seat back pocket during the actual takeoff and landing roll. Cell phones should be in airplane mode or with cellular service disabled – i.e., no signal bars displayed—and cannot be used for voice communications based on FCC regulations that prohibit any airborne calls using cell phones. If your air carrier provides Wi-Fi service during flight, you may use those services. You can also continue to use short-range Bluetooth accessories, like wireless keyboards.

faa_ped_flight

So What Does it Mean?

Airline takeoff and landing was probably one of the final places in modern life where phones were absolutely not tolerated. It stood out as the place where you couldn’t readily turn away from an awkward (or interesting) conversation. Now that this ban is gone, it seems a whole line of stand-up and sitcom humor will almost be completely forgotten.

I don’t of course think this is the downfall of society or a major breakdown in face-to-face reality. I personally love working on a plane where I don’t have all the distractions of my office or home, but I have read reports that people today have much less eye-contact with other human beings than they once did and this contributes to depression and other problems. So I do lament what the represents even if, like most of us, I’m glad for the change and what it means for my personal productivity.

Published by

John Dyer

In my day job, I work at Dallas Theological Seminary, and at night I write Bible software for countries whose leaders could be called "overlords." This one time, I wrote a book about technology and Christian faith. You can find out more about what I'm up to at http://j.hn/.

4 thoughts on “Airplane Mode is Gone: Now You Never Have To Talk to a Stranger Again”

  1. Thanks for the interesting article, John.

    To be fair, a socially-awkward introvert like me simply found other ways to avoid talking to people.

    Airlines helpfully provide a buffet of introversion-aids in the seat pocket. There’s a magazine you can pretend to read, full of lukewarm articles about places you’ll never go. A safety card to memorise. A vomit bag to carefully inspect. And, if all else fails and you’ve read all you can about tea plantations in Sri Lanka and the Boeing 777-800’s exciting variation on sea floatation devices (“Oh, the toggle’s on the LEFT. Edgy.”), there’s always Pretending To Be Asleep.

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